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Oral History of Dora in the Book Pacific Northwest History

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Women in Pacific Northwest History
Revised Edition

Edited by Karen J. Blair

This new edition of Karen Blair's popular anthology originally published in 1989 includes thirteen essays, eight of which are new. Together they suggest the wide spectrum of women's experiences that make up a vital part of Northwest history.

A Chicana in northern Aztlan: An oral history of Dora Sanchez Trevino by:Jerry Garcia

The following interview with Dora Sanchez Trevino elaborates on issues of gender in the workplace, of being Chicana in an Anglo-dominated community, and of her life as a woman.28 Dora provides a glimpse of her childhood and the dynamics of a traditional patriarchal Mexican family. Her relationships with her brother and eventually with her husband depict some of the cultural norms within this patriarchal system. Starting at a very young age, Dora has been employed weeding sugar beet fields, as a teacher's aide, and as a professional employee with a state agency. From this background, she has witnessed the position of Chicanas in the workplace in Quincy. Dora's description of her high school experiences in Quincy contributes to our understanding of the type of race and class relations that existed between Anglos and Chicanos in the early 1960s. Her involvement with Chicano organizations and union activism as well as her continued role in politics illustrate all those issues from a Chicana perspective. Dora Trevino's life in Quincy may not be representative of all Chicanas in the community, but through her eyes we can begin to see a portion of the overall experiences of Chicanas in Quincy.

I chose to feature the history and experience of Dora Sanchez Trevino because she has lived in Quincy since the early 1960s and has firsthand knowledge of the growth and development of the community. Additionally, she has been the only woman of color to hold political office in Quincy, that of councilwoman. Specifically, I wanted to glean information from Dora on her experience as a Chicana in Quincy, to examine what kind of differences or similarities might emerge between her experience and those of other Chicanas in Quincy and of Chicano men.29 Although it is only one example, Dora's family history provides insight into the type of Chicano families arriving in Quincy during the early 1960s. Finally, Dora's personal journey-as a Chicana, mother, wife, and professional worker-provide her with a variety of views and experiences.


 


[Buy This Book]


Pub Date:
2001

ISBN:
PAPER:
   0-295-98046-X
   9780295980461

Price:
Paper: $22.50

Subject Listing:
Western History

Bibliographic information:
334 pp., 27 illus., 5 in color, 6" x 9"

  

Dora is also featured in another book " Mexicans In North Central Washington"  by Jerry Garcia.

The first Mexicans to the region of North Central Washington were braceros (Mexican nationals) brought to Wenatchee, Okanogan, Moses Lake, and later Quincy to work under contract during World War II. The late 1940s witnessed the arrival to the region of Mexican American families who came from south Texas following migratory routes established in the 1920s to the Pacific Northwest. In the early 1950s, Mexican American families from the Yakima Valley moved north seeking economic opportunities. By the late 1980s, as Mexicans in such places as Wenatchee, Quincy, Brewster, and Moses Lake began to settle down and integrate into the community, they started businesses, bought homes, and many moved into a more diverse economic market.

The Above Info. Taken From These Resources:
 
 

 
 
 
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